I’m heading back to my Mediterranean roots with this simple but delicious dish. I can have it for dinner, then lunch the next day and pulse any leftovers into a soup. It makes me chuckle to see these spicy butterbeans retailing for almost £5 per pot in certain supermarkets, when they’re really just bigger, better baked beans. You can either soak dried beans overnight in cold water – which means they will need to be drained, rinsed and boiled vigorously for 10 minutes separately to the sauce – or use a tin of ready-prepared butter beans, which is more expensive but more convenient. If cooking with dried butter beans, use only 150g.

Serves 2 from 65p each. This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links or purchase any ingredients. All prices correct at the time of printing and are subject to change.

1 onion, 5p (54p/1kg)

2 cloves of garlic, 4p (69p/4 bulbs)

a splash of oil, 2p (£1.10/1l)

a pinch of ground cinnamon, <1p (85p/40g)

1 x 400g carton or tin of chopped tomatoes, 29p

1/4 bunch of fresh basil, plus extra to garnish, 17p (70p/30g)

a splash of lemon juice, 1p (69p/250ml)

1 x 400g tin of butter beans, drained and rinsed, 40p

1 vegetable stock cube, 3p

75g Greek cheese (such as feta), crumbled, (75p/200g)

Finely chop the onion and garlic and put into a large saucepan along with the oil and cinnamon.

Cook on a low heat until the onion is softened, then add the chopped tomatoes and continue to simmer on a low heat for a few more minutes.

Chop all the basil stalks. Add the lemon juice, chopped basil stalks and the basil leaves (leaving the extra basil aside for a garnish) and stir in, continuing to simmer.

Stir in the butter beans and crumble in the vegetable stock cube, with a little water if necessary. Stir well to dissolve. Simmer all together on a low heat for approximately 20 minutes at least, but the longer this cooks, the better!

Ladle into bowls and serve garnished with the crumbled cheese and remaining basil leaves, and a generous dash of pepper.

TIPS: Gigantes Plaki can also be eaten cold as a mezze or snack, or mixed with leftover rice and stuffed into a pitta bread for next day’s lunch – it’s delicious cold and perfectly portable. If you don’t have any basil, this is also very good made with parsley. You can make fab burgers from this mixture. Just strain off the tomato sauce, crush and add an extra clove of garlic and a pinch of dried chilli flakes, then gently mash the beans and shape into burgers with floured hands. Fry for a few minutes on each side.

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Recipe by Jack Monroe. Photography by Susan Bell. Like this? Grab the book here!

All text copyright Jack Monroe.