All posts filed under: Bargain Bin

Make-Me-Better Mug, 15p [A Year In 120 Recipes]

Scratchy throat, simultaneous blocked and runny nose, muggy head, general air of malaise? Yeah, that happens a lot round here, courtesy of having a rubbish immune system, awful working hours and an 8 year old. In a bid to banish the heavy-cold feeling, I knock up a large jug of this stuff – and, by golly, it works a treat every time. If you have an office job, take it to work in a Thermos flask or similar, and sip it at your desk to banish the blues. Or take the day off, curl up with a book and snooze, sip, snooze, sip … Makes a 1 litre jug from 15p. This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links and make a purchase. All prices correct at the time of printing and are subject to change. 1 litre water 1 lemon or 2 tbsp lemon juice, 6p …

PUBLICATION DAY! Tin Can Cook is here!

It’s the day I have finally, eagerly been waiting for since I first pitched this book around eight months ago to my publisher, Carole at Bluebird (Pan Macmillan) – Tin Can Cook has hit the shelves this morning!   It’s currently, at the time of writing, sitting at #2 overall in the Amazon bestseller books chart – quite a feat for something I thought was going to be ‘pretty niche but sadly necessary’. Readers have written to me to tell me it is sold out in some of their branches of WHSmiths (they are getting more – see below for where else to buy it if this is the case!) I popped into my local Asda and cheekily spread it across the top shelf to make a jolly bright display this morning, scampering off giggling to myself. It’s fair to say I am having a lovely day!   The crowdfunder to send it to foodbanks has raised £30,000 – with 6,500 confirmed copies being sent out and the remaining money being donated either as cash …

#BlackFriday – up to 72% off Jack Monroe cookbooks 📚

Hey folks! I’m not usually one for the behemoth of commercial greed and stampede that Black Friday seems to be all about, but I can’t help but notice that my books are significantly reduced in price today and it would be remiss of me not to point it out! I don’t know whether it’s because of Black Friday – I mean a cookbook on cooking with tins and basic pasta isn’t exactly a 55″ television with bells on – or whether it’s a lucky fluke, but do make the most of it while it lasts! Cooking On A Bootstrap – WAS £15.99, NOW £4.50. (I make that a whopping 72% off!) A Girl Called Jack – WAS £12.99, NOW £10.49 A Year In 120 Recipes, WAS £17.99, NOW £13.49 Tin Can Cook – WAS £6.99, NOW £6.15 Thankyou for looking! And I should add that yes I do get a small commission for these 🤭 but as usual I only promote things I genuinely use and think are brilliant! 😁 Jack x

Cooking On A Bootstrap: £6.99

Dear readers! For a limited time only, Cooking On A Bootstrap is just £6.99 and available here – I don’t know how long this offer is going to last so please do take advantage of it, and thankyou for your support. ☺️ This site is free to those who need it, and always will be, but it does of course incur costs to run and keep it running. If you use it and benefit, enjoy it, and would like to keep it going, please consider popping something in the tip jar, and thankyou. All text copyright Jack Monroe.

A Year In 120 Recipes, Under £5!

Hi folks! Just a quick heads up that my lovingly termed ‘difficult second album’, A Year In 120 Recipes’, has been reduced to just £4.99 down from £18.99! I’m trying not to smart at the online equivalent of finding myself in the Woolworths Bargain Bin, and instead figured that you might want to know! It’s here for a limited time only, and I love this book. It’s a bit glossier than A Girl Called Jack and Cooking On A Bootstrap, but the recipes are still simple, budget, and delicious, just wrapped up in a pretty bow. Please note this is for the KINDLE version only! Have a lovely weekend! Jack x This site is free to those who need it, and always will be, but it does of course incur costs to run and keep it running. If you use it and benefit, enjoy it, and would like to keep it going, please consider popping something in the tip jar, and thankyou. All text copyright Jack Monroe.

Jack Monroe’s Student Essentials, for Under a Fiver

This is by no means an exhaustive list, but, as a cookbook author who specialises in cheap and cheerful, easy recipes, these are the staples that I try to have in my cupboard at all times. Many a good meal starts with a can of chopped tomatoes, and many a bad one is rescued with a dash of bottled lemon juice and a smattering of salt and pepper. (I’m currently trialling a partnership program with the budget supermarkets that I shop in for my recipes. If you click the links in the recipes I may earn a small commission, but don’t just click for the sake of it as they’re wise to that! As ever, I don’t promote anything I don’t genuinely use and love myself, but if you do online shopping at either of the Big Two, you might want to check out my recommendations) A tin of tomatoes: Starting at 29p for 400g, or 30p for 500g of passatta, a tin of tomatoes is a storecupboard staple. You can use it as the …

Stop Throwing Food Away! Your Guide To #ZeroWasteWeek and Better Budgeting (Part 1)

Every week, the UK throws away tonnes of food – the Guardian reports that the average family throws out twenty four meals a week. Twenty four meals! Now I know some of my readers definitely *aren’t* in that statistic, but we do all sometimes find a rogue bag of salad in the fridge, bread going slightly stale around the edges, yoghurt turning sour, so here are my handy hints and favourite ways to use them up, to help reduce food waste, and your food bills, even just a little bit. Salad. Salad is one of the most wasted foods out there, because it seems to start going bad as soon as you get the bag open and let some air into it. One day it’s a bag of fresh crispy goodness, the next, a sodden mush. But don’t throw it away! Smash it up into a Salad Bag Pesto, or toss it through pasta with a little cheese, or make it into bubble and squeak, or an omelette or frittata, use it in a curry …

How To Dry Mushrooms

Before your mushrooms go slimy in the back of the fridge, dry them out to store them. Dried mushrooms are marketed as a gourmet ingredient when, really, they’re very simple to make. I keep my eyes peeled for mushrooms on special offer, or in the reduced chiller at the supermarket, and stock up on them to dry out at home. Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/gas 4. Clean any dirt from your mushrooms with a dry tea towel or dish cloth, with paper towel or – as I do – use a clean soft toothbrush. Slice or chop the mushrooms as desired. Chopping them into smallish pieces means that they will dry quicker, but slices look nice – it’s up to you. Lay the prepared mushrooms on a baking tray and put into the preheated oven for 45 minutes, turning halfway through. Alternatively, if you don’t want to use the oven, cover the baking tray with a clean tea towel and leave it on the side in the kitchen for 2 days (away from any curious …

Preserving Garlic, Three Ways

Garlic is often cheaper to buy in bulk packs than as individual bulbs – so every now and again I buy a bag or two containing 10 bulbs and spend an hour preserving them. There are three main methods I like to use: freezing, making garlic paste and preserving in vinegar. You can also dry the cloves in a warm oven and grind them into a powder, but I only do this if baking something else at the same time. Freezing: Break open the garlic bulb to remove the cloves, and for each clove chop off the ends and peel away the papery skin. You can freeze the garlic cloves whole if you want to use them whole, but I finely chop mine and freeze the chopped garlic spread out thinly (for ease of breaking off a chunk when it’s frozen). You can just pop the frozen chopped garlic straight into the dish when cooking. Garlic paste must be stored frozen, as home-made garlic paste can cause botulism (due to the low acidity of the …

Pickled Radishes, 24p

I love a pickle. Always have, since being a very little girl filching the tiny silver skin onions from my dad’s piccalilli, to piling my Sunday dinner plate with pickled beetroots and cabbage, to learning to make my own from various small bits of vegetable rolling around the fridge. This summer, I have fallen hard for the humble radish; I usually grow my own but haven’t got around to it yet, so have been picking them up from various nearby shops and supermarkets for a song. The tops make a beautiful peppery pesto, which I have used to top a pizza in the past with excellent results. The little blushing radishes themselves can be folded through a risotto, to pep up a salad, eaten alone with a smudge of salty oil, or, as I discovered to my great delight late yesterday evening, pickled in a flash and left to gently ferment. These glorious pink wafers of crispy tangy gorgeousness are now sitting in my fridge door, where I shall have to be patient with them …