All posts filed under: Bread

Whirlybuns, 11p [Cooking On A Bootstrap]

These little weighty wistful whirls of whimsy came about entirely by accident. I was going to stay with friends in Manchester for the weekend, to all fling our small boys at one another for a raucous time, and I never like to accept hospitality empty handed. So, I set about making a hulking great fruit bread big enough to energise 3 grown men, 3 grown women, and 3 small and boisterous boys. I mixed it, kneaded it, left it to rise…and promptly forgot all about it until I was halfway across the country. Silly me. I came home to find it fermenting beautifully, tickling the top of the teatowel flung over the top of it. I gave it a ginger sniff, it smelled a lot like sourdough. Vaguely remembering a yoghurt based bread I had made a few years ago, I figured it would be fine, and whipped it into these whirlybuns. J and A, here’s what you coulda had… Sorry! Makes a dozen pleasingly enormous buns at 11p each 750g plain flour, 28p (55p/1.5kg/Basics) …

Slow Cooker Bread, 2p

I have been asked for this recipe incessantly on my social media since I started to make it a few days ago, so I made time today to sit down and type it up for my lovely, loyal readers. I hope you enjoy it – I am really loving my slow cooker adventures so far! Many of you have asked me if there is a slow cooker book in the pipeline; I am busy finalising Tin Can Cook at the moment and have started writing the Vegan one, but I always have my feelers out for what my next project is going to be, so if a slow cooker book would be of interest, do leave a comment below and let me know! Each compartment of my triple slow cooker is 1.3l, so to make matters simple, and after a little trial and error, I worked out that the optimum amount of flour to make a really good bread in it, is 260g. I started at 350g, and upon seeing how splendidly it rose, reduced …

Mince Pie Toastie, 36p [Jack Monroe’s Advent Recipes]

Regular readers will know that I have quite the love affair with my toastie maker, and have done since childhood, when my mum would wrestle the big white Breville from beneath the sink and turn it on, and we knew that we had a scalding-hot pocket of delight for our imminent lunch. I rediscovered my love for toasties in adulthood – as life can sometimes be overwhelming and with a child tugging on my arm to be fed, and now nothing is safe from being sandwiched between those hot plates and slathered in cheese. This shouldn’t work, but it definitely does, and received rave reviews from my friends and family. It works with vegan cheese too – try Violife mozzarella slices or similar for the best results. Serves one from 36p each Two slices of white bread, 5p (55p/800g, Asda) 3tbsp mincemeat, 10p (or smashed up leftover mince pies), (£2.02/822g, Asda) 40g cheese, 20p (10 slices cheddar/99p, Smartprice at Asda) A smudge of oil, 1p Assemble your sandwich in the usual fashion: Lay the bread …

90’s Special Peanut & Cheese Loaf, 18p

This loaf was inspired by one in The Dairy Book Of Home Cookery, one of the only cookbooks I can remember my parents having when I lived at home. A meaty tome of 1000 simple recipes, I would flick through it for inspiration for my Home Economics lessons as a teenager. It has no recipe introductions and very scant instructions, but it is a comprehensive cookery course to rival any other. Some of the recipes I feel are best left back in the 1990s, like the banana and stilton sandwiches, but some of them stand the test of time as cornerstones and classics. I have tweaked the original recipe slightly here. Serves 6 from 18p each. This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links or purchase any ingredients. All prices correct at the time of printing and are subject to change. 75g peanuts, 18p (48p/200g) 75g mushrooms, …

Corn Muffins, 8p [Cooking On A Bootstrap]

Not quite cornbread in the traditional sense, these joyous little bursts of bready sweetness are ideal for mopping up a chilli, topping with an egg and some greens for a speedy brunch, or packing in a picnic or lunchbox. I like to double the batch and pop some in the freezer for a lazy day. MAKES 8 GENEROUS MUFFINS from 8p each . This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links or purchase any ingredients. All prices correct at the time of printing and are subject to change. 50g softened butter or baking block, diced, or 50ml oil (if you’re totally brassic), plus extra for greasing, 11p (55p/250g) 250g plain flour, plus extra for dusting, 8p (45p/1.5kg) ½ tsp salt, 1p (27p/750g) 2 tsp baking powder, 4p (£1.40/170g) 50g granulated sugar, 3p (69p/1kg) ¼ tsp chilli flakes or 2 pinches of cayenne pepper, <1p 70g tinned or …

Peanut Butter Bread, 17p [A Year In 120 Recipes]

I’m a massive fan of the humble peanut butter – almost obsessive, in fact. I’ve smuggled it into a sauce for chicken, celebrated it in a frozen yoghurt, and paired it with jam for cutesy thumbprint cookies. Now it’s peanut butter bread. A favourite in my household, it’s great toasted with butter or jam, dunked into soups, or eaten warm and cakey with a dollop of custard … Serves 6 from 17p each. This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links or purchase any ingredients. All prices correct at the time of printing and are subject to change. 60g baking block or butter, plus a little extra for greasing, 13p (55p/250g) 300g flour, 9p (45p/1.5kg) 1 tablespoon baking powder, 12p (£1.40/170g) 120g sugar, 8p (69p/1kg) 150g peanut butter, 31p (70p/340g) 250ml milk, 14p (55p/1l) 1 egg, 15p (89p/6 free range eggs) Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/gas 4. …

Chickpea & Tomato Brunch Loaf, 16p [A Girl Called Jack]

This loaf first appeared in my first cookbook, A Girl Called Jack, and is a favourite weekend recipe of mine. It was based on a similar loaf from Economy Gastronomy, by Allegra McEvedy and Paul Merrett, using mashed chickpeas and sun dried tomatoes, but mine is, as ever, the more austere version. It is delightfully accidentally vegan, and robust enough for toasting, serving with a pile of grilled tomatoes or some kind of roasted red pepper dip. If you don’t finish it before it goes stale, the breadcrumbs make an excellent topping for a simple pasta dish, too. Makes 1 decent sized loaf, to serve 6 from 16p each. This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links and make a purchase. All prices correct at the time of printing and are subject to change. 400g carton of chickpeas, 40p 1 tbsp oil, 2p (£1.10/1l) A pinch of …

Pappa Al Pomodoro, 29p [Cooking On A Bootstrap]

I love a good tomato soup, and quite often with the humble tomato, simplicity is key. So imagine my delight, one evening, finding a recipe for Pappa al Pomodoro while idly leafing through the iconic River Café Cookbook ( Rose Gray and Ruth Rogers). I’d never heard of it, but fell in love instantly – garlic, salt, herbs, tomatoes and a little bread. Of course, the original calls for fresh tomatoes in late summer and ‘open-textured white bread made with olive oil, such as Pugliese’, given that the River Café is famous for tremendously good Italian cooking (and was home to a fledgling Jamie Oliver, Sam and Sam Clark of Moro and many many other great chefs of our time). I decided to see if I could make my own version, from my basics, including my stash of old bits of bread . Who has a toddler or fussy teenager, or even adult, in their household that doesn’t eat their crusts? I used to battle with my Small Boy in the morning about the crusts …

Pint-Glass Bread, 14p [Cooking On A Bootstrap]

This is the easiest and tastiest bread, from only a handful of ingredients, and a pint glass. No weighing, just throw it together. The beer gives it a sourdough taste, without all the fannying about that genuine sourdough requires. Serves 6 from 14p each. This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links or purchase any ingredients. All prices correct at the time of printing and are subject to change. 2 pint glasses of plain flour, plus extra for dusting, 18p 1 pint glass of warm cider or beer, 57p (£2.05/2l Crofters cider) 1 tsp dried active yeast, 5p a pinch of salt, 1p 1 tsp sugar, 1p oil, for the dough and greasing, 3p Stand your pint glass in a large mixing bowl, then fill it with flour. Tip it into the bowl and repeat. Use the butt, or bottom, or arse, of your glass to make …

Apple & Cinnamon Loaf Cake, 15p [A Girl Called Jack]

This recipe started off as muffins that I made at school many years ago, and eventually became a warm, sweet, moist loaf cake. It’s quite soft due to the quantity of apples used, lending it a crumbly texture that makes it delicious to eat in a bowl with custard or natural yoghurt. It firms up by the next day – that is, if there’s any left! Serves 6, from 15p each. This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links or purchase any ingredients. All prices correct at the time of printing and are subject to change. 3 small apples, cored, 22p zest and juice of ½ a lemon or 1 tablespoon bottled lemon juice, 3p 100g butter or baking block, plus extra to grease the tin, 11p 100g sugar, 7p 2 eggs (or 2 tbsp applesauce, to make it vegan), 30p a generous handful of sultanas, 9p …

Lardy Buns, 15p [Cooking On A Bootstrap]

I’ll always remember my first lardy cake; picked up from a surprisingly baked-goods-laden petrol station on the way home from a trip to Kent, and I subsequently slept all the way home in the passenger seat off the back of a few mouthfuls of unfashionably fat-laden, soft sweet carbohydrates. I set about researching how to make my own; half a block of lard still loafing in the fridge door from a previous Live Below The Line challenge could finally be put to use. Definitely not one for every lunch of the week, but a good shoulders-down, satisfying, occasional winter comfort. To make a whole loaf, simply pat into a round and cook for an hour instead. Makes 6 generously weighty ones at 15p each, that could double as a weapon should an intruder strike. This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links or purchase any ingredients. All …

Beer Bread, 5p [Cooking On A Bootstrap]

I had a small gathering of friends for lunch yesterday – the recipes of which are numerous and will follow in good time – and as is usually the way when a gathering imbibe themselves on sun and soaking up well-deserved drinks, as I tidied up this morning (for I am a slattern, but also have concussion and took my sober self to bed early after such frivolity), I came across half a glass of warm beer that had been sitting on the table all evening. Rather than pour it down the sink, I decided to rework the very simple Pint Glass Bread recipe from Cooking On A Bootstrap, and make use of it. Makes one small loaf, proportions dependent on how much or how little skanky warm beer you find behind the couch.  Serves 4-6 from 5p each. 240ml leftover beer, 14p (Tesco Everyday Value Bitter is £1 for 4x440ml) 300g flour, 9p (Tesco Everyday Value flour is 55p for 1.5kg) 1 tbsp/8.5g yeast, 8p (Allinson Easy Bake Yeast, £1/100g) First, measure your leftover beer. …

Caramel Banana Cake, 16p [A Year In 120 Recipes]

This cake is a cheap but luxurious twist on my original banana bread, slightly more moist and gooey than the first iteration, with a home made sticky syrup sauce to drizzle over the top, ideally warm from a jug. I have made this as a loaf cake and also as a round, Victoria sponge type cake, split in the middle with a buttercream style icing and extra syrup sandwiching it together. It can be as simple or as showstopper as you want it to be. If you keep frozen berries kicking about, scatter a few on top of the cake mixture as it goes into the oven; as it cooks, they will gently sink to suspend in the finished delicacy; if you stir them in, there is a risk they will all sink and give you a soggy bottom. If this happens, I generally allow the cake to cook completely before removing from the tin, level off the risen top so it is completely flat (a bread knife is best) and carefully turn it over …

Bread, Bean & Fennel Stew, 17p

The idea of putting bread in stew is one that dates back hundreds of years, to a medieval broth known as ‘caudle’. It is both a use-up for stale bread, or crusts cut off for fussy children, and adds both texture and thickness to a liquid broth. This soup is hearty, wholesome and delicious – made in a grey January fog for a group of hungry friends, and devoured with gusto. The ingredients are all fairly interchangeable; the beans can be any kind you fancy, even plain old baked beans will do. You can extend this with some diced chopped veg, or sweeten and substantiate the base with chopped onion and garlic, but I like it just as it is, simple and huggy. The fennel is just there for a touch of sweetness; if you don’t have any in, a teaspoon of sugar and some herbs will do the job just fine. To make this gluten free, simply replace the bread with gluten free bread of your choice. I make mine with kidney beans sometimes, …

Tw*tbreads, 4p

I joke that ninety-seven percent of the spontaneous conversations that my friends start with me – especially mid afternoon or early in the evening – are panicked cookery conundrums, photographs of burned pans, musings about what to have for dinner based on photographs of their kitchen cupboards, or emergency cake queries. This afternoon was no exception. It started off innocently enough, as a dear friend sent a photograph of my tomatoey baba ghanoush recipe, announcing she was going to attempt to make it. This, you understand, is code for ‘please put your phone notifications on LOUD, because I’m going to need you’. I know how this goes by now. Four minutes passed before she was hinting for some kind of easy bread recipe to go with it. I hunted through my archives and found a flatbread recipe I had written for the Cook For Syria cookbook last year. ‘I’ll simplify it for you,’ I said. ‘Flatbread for tw*ts.’ (Yes, this is how we speak to one another. No, you were never supposed to know.) ‘TW*TBREAD!’. And so, the …