All posts filed under: Gluten Free

Peach & Chickpea Curry, 61p [A Girl Called Jack]

This is my favourite curry, my go-to, easy but perfect comfort food. I used to make it with a cheap turkey leg, but any protein source will do – so feel free to chuck a fistful of whatever you fancy in with the onions if you want to bulk it out or extend it. Recipe from A Girl Called Jack. Serves 2 from 61p each (This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links if you make a purchase.) 400g canned chickpeas, 40p 1 onion, 5p (54p/1kg) 2 fat cloves of garlic, 4p (17p/bulb) 1 chilli or a pinch of dried chilli flakes, <1p (80p/100g) a splash of oil, 2p (£1.10/1l) 1 tsp cumin (ground or seeds), 2p (£1.15/100g) 1 x 400g tin of peaches (or apricots or mandarins), 33p (33p/411g) 1 x 400g carton or tin of chopped tomatoes, 30p a handful of fresh coriander, finely chopped …

Carrot, Cumin & Kidney Bean Burgers, 9p [A Girl Called Jack]

This burger is where the media storm began, and dubbed ‘the 9p burger’ because of the low cost of the ingredients used to make it, it’s one of my most popular recipes. A can of value range red kidney beans is a cheap but excellent source of protein and I built a lot of my early cooking around it, and they became a firm staple in my household. I triple the recipe to make a batch of them, and freeze them in patties to whip out at a moment’s notice and fry on a low heat. I like mine best in a pitta bread (22p for 6) and a dollop of mango chutney or mayo… (I’m currently trialling a partnership program with the budget supermarkets that I shop in for my recipes. If you click the links in the recipes I may earn a small commission, but don’t just click for the sake of it as they’re wise to that! As ever, I don’t promote anything I don’t genuinely use and love myself, but if …

Marmite, Peanut Butter & Honey Popcorn, 11p [Good Food For Bad Days]

This came about by accident; I couldn’t decide between peanut butter and marmite popcorn, or peanut butter and honey, so on a whim I decided to amalgamate all three. And good lord, I have no regrets about it at all. The tang of marmite, earthiness of the peanut butter and the sweet stickiness of the honey are a triumvirate of absolute bliss – Caroline and I polished off the bowl faster than I could say ‘How many should this serve? Four? Oh. Us.’ To make this vegan, replace the honey with golden syrup, or other thick liquid sweetener of your choice. Serves four. Allegedly. From 11p per portion. (I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links or purchase any ingredients.) 80g corn kernels, 16p (£1/500g) 2 tbsp/32g peanut butter, 7p (70p/340g) 2 tbsp/42g honey, 12p (£1.24/425g) 1 tbsp butter or light cooking oil, 2p (£1.09/1l) 1 tsp/5g marmite, 5p (£2.70/250g) – cheaper …

Apple, Pear and Sultana Baked Oats, 29p

I love to start the week for my little family with slightly luxurious breakfasts when time permits, but I’m currently on a book deadline and have been at my desk since 0630 this morning. However, this pudding-for-breakfast takes mere seconds to assemble, and tastes like love, and goodness, and a comforting blast of warmth on a slightly chilly morning. Mrs J and Small Boy were delighted, and I took the remains of the tin back to my desk to nibble on as I worked. Although decadent tasting, these oats contain three of your five a day (two if sharing between three, because, maths) – not bad for the work of a moment!  To make it vegan, or dairy free, simply replace the milk with a plant-based milk of your choice. I can highly recommend Alpro Soya Vanilla for this – my son’s favourite! To make it gluten-free, swap the oats for gluten-free oats. Serves two or three, from 29p each. (I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate …

Cannelini Beurre Blanc, 38p [Tin Can Cook]

I have very little time for the notion that some foods are ‘not for poorer people’ – it is a criticism I have come up against time and again, whether it is kale pesto irritating the commentariat at the Daily Mail, or a slosh of £2.50 table wine in a risotto, there is a frankly hideous misconception that good food is for the ‘deserving’, with the parameters of who deserves exactly what seemingly set by those who have never had a tenner in their pocket to last a week. Sometimes, when testing new recipes, I have a moment of hesitation, wondering how to frame it to reduce the petty background chatter around what I consider to be ‘food for everyone’. And then I carry on. This was one such recipe. An unctuous and subtly powerful sauce reduced to a thick, provocative shroud for slow-cooked cannellini beans and a scant handful of pasta. It would sit proudly on any hifalutin restaurant menu, but its main ingredient is a tin of beans and a slug of vinegar. …

Ratatouille, 69p

For the last two years of our courtship, Mrs J has been asking me very nicely to make her a ratatouille. Some childhood memory of a baked potato hot from a food van, piled high with soft, veg-laden ratatouille, stirs within her a bone-deep blissful comfort. Oblivious to the emotional sentiment, I would simply mutter something about ‘not being a frigging cafe’, and make something else. The truth is, I had never made a ratatouille before. My knowledge of it stemmed entirely from a Pixar movie starring a small excitable animated rat, and an indeterminable can of mush I was given at the food bank once that was so inexorably unappetising, I never wanted to see it or its ilk again. And then one day a few weeks ago, with the holy triumvirate of courgette, aubergine and pepper in the fridge, I decided to surprise her. I dug out my French cookery books – French Provincial Cooking by Elizabeth David, The Little Paris Kitchen by Rachel Khoo, and Elisabeth Luard’s Classic French Cooking, all liberated …

Chickpea and Aubergine Curry, 66p

I love a rendang curry – the first time I ever made it, it was with slow roasted pork belly, finely sliced and slowly cooked in the sweet, sour, spicy sauce. It was so rich, so flavoursome, so fulsome and delightful, that I dared not attempt to recreate it again for many years. And then, moving my office (sounds fancy, it is also my dining room and general crap storage area), I came across a pile of old recipe notebooks, and started to pore through them in that classic way of procrastinating my any means possible. I found my pork belly rendang recipe, and scribbled down the component ingredients for the paste and sauce. I contemplated making it with jackfruit instead, but I decided to save that can for another day, and opted for slow-cooked creamy chickpeas and thinly sliced, meaty aubergine instead. Mrs J declared it one of the finest meals I had ever cooked – she says that a lot, so either my cookery improves on a daily basis, or she knows how …

Cannelini, Leek & Sausage Pasta, 41p

I have set myself a challenge to blog a new recipe every single day for a few weeks – I used to blog regularly, when I was a single mum on the dole scraping meals together from loose change and a food bank box – and I would write about what I had to hand and what I would make from it. That was six years ago now, and both my spice rack and repertoire have expanded beyond recognition. I missed writing regularly for pleasure, however, especially as I cook on average three brand new recipes Every Single Day. Most of them are scrawled on scraps of plain A4 paper, then filed away in a huge lever arch file, to be pulled out and shuffled into some kind order and shaped into a book at some point in the future. I’ve decided to keep a kind of kitchen notebook here on my blog; keeping to my original principles of cooking great food for a little money, with a simple collection of basic ingredients, and costing …

South Indian Inspired Egg Curry, 57p

This recipe is based on one I have eaten many times at a South Indian restaurant in my hometown of Southend on Sea. I have tweaked it a little, to simplify it, while trying to maintain the baseline of the original. I try not to tinker with other cuisines too much if I can help it – I did when I first started out as a food writer, I was young and more naive than I am now, and less tuned in to the politics of food outside of my own topics of poverty and austerity. This isn’t a conversation for now, as I am still trying to pin down my thoughts on the complexities of appropriation with regards to recipe writing – and I hope that my work falls on the right side of appreciation rather than riding roughshod over culturally important treasures. An essay for another time, however. For now, here’s my take on a South Indian inspired egg curry – for a more authentic recipe, I recommend you check out Swasthi Shreekanth’s …

Orange-Peel Salt

This, like so many of my recipes, came about from a pondering in the kitchen this morning. I had just finished telling Mrs J that I was thinking of blogging more, properly, again, because I miss writing for pleasure rather than writing for deadlines – two books in a year is quite an effort! She agreed with me that wittering about my day to someone other than the cat ought to be a healthy pursuit, and so I pottered back downstairs into the kitchen feeling pleased with myself. Then I made this orange juice, and just as I was about to scoop the peel up in my hands and pop it in the compost bin, A Thought occured to me. What if I didn’t throw it away, and instead gave it a whole new lease of life? I vaguely recalled buying a tiny pot of yuzu peel at Borough Market once, probably for the price of my firstborn and a limb, and set about trying to make something similar. Yuzu is a fruit that I …

Orange, Ginger & Turmeric Juice, 19p

You don’t need a juicer to make this juice – they’re expensive and difficult to clean – I just use a standard blender and a sieve to make all manner of juices! This one was a use-up for some oranges that were past their best in the fruit bowl, but would have been wasteful to throw them away, so I decided to put them to good use instead. Mrs J declared that it was very similar to a high street branded orange, ginger and turmeric shot, and I just smiled and said thankyou. Good for blasting colds – which we seem to have in perpetuity in this household at the moment. Made 4 glasses from 19p each. (This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links or purchase any ingredients.)   6 small oranges, 67p (£1.35/600g growers selection sweetclems, Asda) 20g fresh ginger, 7p (45p/125g, fresh ginger, Asda) …

Garlic Jam, 76p

This started out as a curious thought in the back of my head – I know garlic softens and sweetens the longer you cook it, so could I make garlic jam? I scribbled some notes based on what little I know about jam making, dug out an old onion marmalade recipe to use as a rough guide, and promptly forgot all about it. Then one weekend, I acquired some beautiful purple garlic bulbs, and the garlic jam pondering resurfaced… I spent a pleasant evening peeling and slicing 40 cloves of garlic, and ended up with 2 jars of this sweet, punchy, unapologetic condiment. You can serve it on toast with freshly sliced ripe tomatoes, or with buttery sautéed mushrooms, or dolloped on the side of a curry, roast dinner, or wherever takes your fancy. (This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links and make a purchase.) Makes …

Peanut Butter & Jam Crumble, 21p [Cooking On A Bootstrap]

I am near fanatical about peanut butter and jam – or peanut butter and jelly, for my readers across the pond. I have previously made these extremely popular PBJ cookies (vegan version here), PBJ microwave brownies for BBC Good Food, a PBJ semifreddo ice cream for a Small Boy and a PBJ pie with peanut butter hand-kneaded into the pastry, stuffed with thick, unctuous strawberry jam. My latest homage to my favourite marriage of flavours is this – the PBJ crumble I served at a lunch for 10 yesterday – met with a chorus of rapture as I placed it on the table (readers who are old enough – or young enough – to have seen the original Toy Story film, it was like offering it to a crowd of small green aliens…) It went down a treat with all ten of us, even the unenthusiastic crumble hater and the one who insisted she didn’t like peanut butter – and four of us had generous seconds (and six were mildly disappointed). It can be made …

Thrupenny PBJ Cookies, 3p [A Girl Called Jack]

This afternoon one of my readers got in touch via Twitter to ask me how to make these cookies vegan, for a friend. This is one of my favourite recipes for a rainy-day activity with my small boy, and as the weather draws in around us and we will be looking for more baking days than beach days, it seemed as good a time as any to convert it for my vegan friends. If you don’t have self raising flour kicking about, just use plain flour and add 1 level teaspoon of baking powder instead. To make these gluten free, replace the flour with any gluten free flour blend, or ground almonds. This recipe first appeared in ‘A Girl Called Jack’. Makes 12 cookies at under 3p each (This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links or purchase any ingredients.) 50g sunflower spread or other dairy-free butter …

Peanut Butter Frozen Yoghurt, 20p [A Girl Called Jack]

This simple recipe is a must for any peanut butter lovers. Its first incarnation was as peanut butter-flavoured yoghurt – made by mixing two of my staple food items together for a sweet treat – and it went from there. I don’t add sugar or syrup to sweeten this recipe when I make it as I like the slight tang of the peanut butter, but feel free to add a tablespoon or two if you wish. It is probably possible to make this vegan – I am going to experiment with it and report back. Serves 6 at 20p each 500g natural yoghurt, 45p (45p/500g, Smart Price at Asda) 200g crunchy peanut butter, 38p (65p/340g, Smart Price at Asda) 100ml milk, 7p (67p/1l, Long life skimmed milk, Smart Price at Asda) 2 tablespoons sugar, 1p (64p/1kg, Silver Spoon at Asda) 100g chocolate, 30p (Smart Price at Asda) Pour the yoghurt into a mixing bowl and stir in the peanut butter and milk until well combined. Add the sugar, if using. Finely chop or grate the …