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PUBLICATION DAY! Tin Can Cook is here!

It’s the day I have finally, eagerly been waiting for since I first pitched this book around eight months ago to my publisher, Carole at Bluebird (Pan Macmillan) – Tin Can Cook has hit the shelves this morning!   It’s currently, at the time of writing, sitting at #2 overall in the Amazon bestseller books chart – quite a feat for something I thought was going to be ‘pretty niche but sadly necessary’. Readers have written to me to tell me it is sold out in some of their branches of WHSmiths (they are getting more – see below for where else to buy it if this is the case!) I popped into my local Asda and cheekily spread it across the top shelf to make a jolly bright display this morning, scampering off giggling to myself. It’s fair to say I am having a lovely day!   The crowdfunder to send it to foodbanks has raised £30,000 – with 6,500 confirmed copies being sent out and the remaining money being donated either as cash …

[UPDATE!] Your GoFundMe Donations for getting Tin Can Cook to foodbanks

A quick update on the GoFundMe page for donating copies of Tin Can Cook to foodbanks. Thank you so much for the support you’ve given to this project so far. I have an exciting update today which means that your generous donations will cover more tinned goods and more copies of Tin Can Cook than I originally worked out.   The total donation at the time of writing is £23,977, (less the GoFundMe admin fee of £916.63 – which I have no control over) making a whopping £23,060.37 donated. This entire amount is going to be used to supply books to food banks.    I originally cautiously estimated that every £9 donated would cover 1 copy of Tin Can Cook and 3 cans of food, which would have covered 2,562 books and 7686 cans.   However, two great things have happened which mean your donations will actually go further, supplying more cans and more books to Trussell Trust food banks than originally estimated.   Heinz have kindly agreed to donate 10,000 cans for free to this project – 2,314 more than …

Biscoff Key Lime Pie, 66p

I’ll be frank with you, this pie is something of a commitment. It needs starting the night before, with two separate trips to the oven and two to the fridge, but the result is fantastically worth it. I make this in a 15cm (six inch) deep cake tin; although it looks smaller when presented to guests or family, the depth on it is astounding, and the ratio of lime cream to base works very well. As a naturally clumsy person, I find that smaller, deeper crumb crust pies are easier to handle, with less chance of cracking than their wider, slender counterparts. If you use a thinner tin, reduce the cooking time accordingly. I used standard limes for this, as key limes are hard to come by in May in Southend on Sea, and when I was researching this recipe, the general consensus seemed to be that although key limes are traditional, other limes are acceptable. Some cooks use a blend of limes and lemons to achieve the tart, slightly unripe sourness of a true …

Poverty lingers a septic wound, choleric, stenching, bursting rancid all over your Sunday best.

You jest at scars, that never felt a wound, I muttered to my phone screen as an avatar of a sneering man stared back, his grainy face positioned just to the left of his barbed jab about why a ‘bestselling author needs to be begging for tips on Twitter’. I bit my lip, shaking with suppressed anger. If he was surprised and outraged by it, it was nothing compared to how I was feeling. ‘Didn’t you get a hundred grand from Katie Hopkins?’ he continued below my tweet gently reminding my readers that I run a 500 recipe, ad-free, subscription-free website on an entirely voluntary basis and pointing them to my tip jar. Well, no I didn’t. I won a libel judgement that paid out a sum that didn’t cover the lost earnings for the 20 months the case had all-consumed me and most of my mental health and energy. I repaid the friends who had bailed out my rent in the periods I was unfit to work, bought a sofa in the sale, carpeted …

The Best Mushrooms You’ll Ever Eat, 31p [Cooking On A Bootstrap]

This recipe seems and sounds too simple to be true, but sometimes the best dishes are those that allow their ingredients to sing at the tops of their voices without too much complicated messing around drowning them out. I love a mushroom, especially when I can find exotic varieties reduced to clear in the corner shops and supermarkets, taking them home and drying them out low and slow in the bottom of the oven to use again at a later date. It is these dried mushrooms that make up the mushroom stock in this recipe, but if you don’t have any, just cook fresh ones for a little longer than the recipe suggests. These pair perfectly with a pile of buttery mashed potato, or fried rice, or my Moonshine Mash. Serves 2 at 33p each 10g dried mushrooms, 21p (85p/400g, Basics, and dried. Dried weight equivalent to 10× fresh weight) a pinch of salt, <1p (40p/750g) 1tbsp dark soy sauce, 10p (£1/150ml) a small onion, 9p (90p/1.5kg, Basics) 2 fat cloves of garlic, 3p (35p/2 …

We need to talk about Diane Abbott. Now. (EXPLICIT CONTENT)

This is not a recipe. I wrote this as a series of tweets today and readers asked for it as a blog post, so here it is. Our politics may differ, so feel free to skip straight back to the recipes if that’s what you’re here for. WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT DIANE ABBOTT. Right one of us political writer people needs to do this and it looks like it’s me. Grab a seat. I wanna talk about Diane. Diane was first elected as an MP in 1987, the year before I was born. She has been dedicated to serving the British public for longer than I have even been alive. Hold that thought. Understand it. Diane was the first black woman to have a seat in the House of Commons. She MADE HISTORY. Her father was welder, her mother a nurse. How many working class kids do we have in politics these days? None, really. Diane went to Cambridge University to study history. IN THE SEVENTIES. In 2017 only 15 black kids went to …