All posts tagged: berries

Mulled Rich Fruit Tea, 31p [Jack Monroe’s Advent Recipes]

I have tried many times to recreate a decent mulled ‘wine’ that is alcohol-free – because despite what legend may otherwise tell you, boiling alcohol doesn’t eliminate it completely, it just reduces it – and by how much is so comprehensively variable that I dare not even try to tackle it. Mulling alcohol-free red wine would seem like the obvious choice, but I’m yet to find one that stands up to the challenge. If you know of a good, jammy Shiraz in the alcohol-free section, do let me know! Until then, this experiment with my slow cooker has proved to be the favourite; the deep smoke from the slow-brewed Lapsang and the dark, juicy fruit flavours combine with the traditional mulling spices to make a hot, rich, grown-up drink, without the headache. Some of the ingredients may seem a little odd – so let me explain. The ginger and sultanas are to replace the traditional ginger wine that forms the base of mulled wine. Ginger wine is made from raisins and ginger, so I simply …

Bruised Eton Mess, 76p

As the wife-to-be of a news commissioner, my small household is often saturated with the goings on of the day. Radio 4 in the bedroom and bathroom, BBC news and Channel 4 and Sky flicked through all evening, half a dozen newspapers on the mat at any given moment and a veritable hoard of them stuffed beside the toilet and under the sofa. As much as I try to shut it out for my own mental health and encroaching book deadlines, I couldn’t fail to notice that it’s all going rather awry at the moment. A few years ago I attended a General Strike anti-austerity protest in London, and made, for the occasion, a placard daubed in Jackson-Pollock-esque splatters of magenta, lilac and cream, scrawled with ‘THIS IS AN ETON MESS’ across the front. My food has always been steeped in the political, given that my blog was born from food bank boxes and the sheer hopelessness of poverty in a time of austerity, and tonight was no exception. As overpromoted mop-headed weasels and 18th …

Peanut Butter & Jam Crumble, 21p [Cooking On A Bootstrap]

I am near fanatical about peanut butter and jam – or peanut butter and jelly, for my readers across the pond. I have previously made these extremely popular PBJ cookies (vegan version here), PBJ microwave brownies for BBC Good Food, a PBJ semifreddo ice cream for a Small Boy and a PBJ pie with peanut butter hand-kneaded into the pastry, stuffed with thick, unctuous strawberry jam. My latest homage to my favourite marriage of flavours is this – the PBJ crumble I served at a lunch for 10 yesterday – met with a chorus of rapture as I placed it on the table (readers who are old enough – or young enough – to have seen the original Toy Story film, it was like offering it to a crowd of small green aliens…) It went down a treat with all ten of us, even the unenthusiastic crumble hater and the one who insisted she didn’t like peanut butter – and four of us had generous seconds (and six were mildly disappointed). It can be made …

Ping Porridge, 3p [Cooking On A Bootstrap]

Ping porridge is so called because it can be made in a microwave, on the move, and is perfect in its portability. Grab a Tupperware-style container with a lid, a permanent marker and some oats, and you’re good to go. The adornments and accoutrements from there on are on are up to you. I find a taller container better for this, for accuracy, but if you don’t mind using a squat takeaway carton or similar, use whatever you prefer. I like to add apple and ground cinnamon to mine in the colder months, or grated dark chocolate and a few frozen berries, or tinned pears. Have fun with it – use it as a base and play with it as much or as little as you like. Serves 1, from 3p. This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links or purchase any ingredients. All prices correct at …

Berry Bircher Pot, 24p [A Year In 120 Recipes]

I made this imitation of a breakfast pot I saw in a high-street coffee shop, then worked out that it had cost me a sixth of the price it was selling for on the high street! I included a seeds-and-fruit adornment in homage to the original, and it works well with any mixture of dried fruit and nuts you have at your disposal, but if you don’t have any, that’s fine too, it’s just for show really. You can defrost the mixed berries by giving them a quick spritz under the cold tap. Serves 2 from 24p each – they look small but they’re incredibly filling! This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links or purchase any ingredients. All prices correct at the time of printing and are subject to change. 60g porridge oats, 5p (75p/1kg) 200g natural yoghurt, 16p (80p/1kg) 200ml milk, 11p (55p/1l) 50g frozen …

Fluffy Berry Pancakes, 41p [Cooking On A Bootstrap]

These are a favourite of my Small Boy, and something of a lazy Sunday morning tradition. We pop to the shop with our coats on over our pyjamas, grab a newspaper for me and a comic for him, and loaf around with all the breakfast we can possibly manage, reading, chatting and making up for a week of hastily bolted porridge and cartons of juice on the run to school. Breakfast rolls into lunch, into walks, into movies, into catching up with friends, but a Sunday isn’t a Sunday without a pancake in our house. Vegan readers, you can replace eggs with 2 over-ripe mashed bananas, and butter with a little oil. This recipe is easily multiplied for larger crowds, in which case pop a couple of baking trays in the oven as it preheats to around 140 ° C/ 275 ° F/ gas 1, and use them to keep the pancakes warm as you cook. It’s no fun being the person with the cold pancakes at the breakfast table. SERVES 2 from 41p each. …

Caramel Banana Cake, 16p [A Year In 120 Recipes]

This cake is a cheap but luxurious twist on my original banana bread, slightly more moist and gooey than the first iteration, with a home made sticky syrup sauce to drizzle over the top, ideally warm from a jug. I have made this as a loaf cake and also as a round, Victoria sponge type cake, split in the middle with a buttercream style icing and extra syrup sandwiching it together. It can be as simple or as showstopper as you want it to be. If you keep frozen berries kicking about, scatter a few on top of the cake mixture as it goes into the oven; as it cooks, they will gently sink to suspend in the finished delicacy; if you stir them in, there is a risk they will all sink and give you a soggy bottom. If this happens, I generally allow the cake to cook completely before removing from the tin, level off the risen top so it is completely flat (a bread knife is best) and carefully turn it over …