All posts tagged: treat

Peanut Butter Ice Cream, 43p

Caster sugar is generally more expensive than standard granulated sugar (currently £1.19 for 1kg compared to 69p for granulated at the supermarket) – but a few years ago I worked out that I could make my own substitute for it. All you need is a small powerful blender, and a bag of regular sugar, and you can blitz it up to a finely ground sugar suitable for making ice creams and floaty-light cakes with. Admittedly the blender is an initial investment, but I use mine every day for making soups from scrappy leftovers, hummus from cans of chickpeas, light and creamy batters for pancakes and yorkshire puddings – so it’s well worth digging into your pocket for in the long term, if you can. This recipe is from A Year In 120 Recipes, my 2014 book of seasonal, thrifty recipes, available here. Serves 6 from 43p each. Prices from Tesco, correct at time of writing. This recipe is not sponsored, however I make make a small fee if you click a link and make a …

Peanut Butter Granola, 8p

I first made this for myself as I love peanut butter in the mornings, but not having a toaster, popping bread under the grill inevitably goes wrong when you have a child to get washed and socked and shoed in the mornings – so I cobbled this together and bunged it in a big jar. Perfect with hot milk, or cold, or even pop it in the microwave for a minute for a warm, soft, stodgy, comforting start to your day. There are endless variations to this too, just add a good oil, like coconut, in place of the peanut butter to hold your oats together (oo-er) and the possibilities are endless. I recommend dark chocolate with toasted or ground almonds if the purse stretches. Dark chocolate and marmalade is similar to a famous round chocolate orange in a bright blue box, and for breakfast, such fun! Golden syrup can be replaced with treacle, sugar, or any sweetening agent of your choice. If you feel like erring on the side of virtuous, chop a banana …

Cinnamon Biscoff Donuts, 14p

  I very rarely advocate the use of specialist equipment in my recipes, even less so something that was purchased in a flight of fancy in an evening of late night internet browsing, but dear reader, I can assure you that you won’t regret this one. My Small Boy and I have recently acquired a terrible midweek habit of popping into the shop near the train station on the way home from school to kill a little time, and emerging with a bag of donuts. Like all good traditions, I’m not sure how or when it started, but ‘the weekly donut’ is now a part of my parenting style, and try as I might, I cannot bring myself to discontinue it. And so, for want of some self control or an ounce of discipline, I have made it my mission to make our own, on a flight of fancy that I will start with standard donuts and work my way back to healthier ones once I’ve mastered them. So here we are; me standing in …

Home made Pop T*rts, 10p [A Year In 120 Recipes]

As a child I loved Pop-Tarts™, those saccharine toaster pastries thick with white icing and multi-coloured sprinkles that, when eaten greedily from the toaster, would scald your tongue with red-hot jam. I decided to see if I could make my own version from scratch, pastry and all, and here they are. They’re not an everyday breakfast but they’re definitely a why-the-heck-not breakfast! Makes 8 at 10p each. This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links and make a purchase. All prices correct at the time of printing and are subject to change. 100g unsalted butter or substitute, plus extra for greasing, 22p 200g plain flour, plus extra for the worktop, 7p (45p/1.5kg) 6 tablespoons cold water 6–8 tablespoons jam, 10p (28p/454g) 6 tablespoons icing sugar, approx. 50g, 10p (£1/500g) sprinkles, 30p (£1/50g) Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/gas 4. First, make the pastry. Either melt the butter in …

Caramel Banana Cake, 16p [A Year In 120 Recipes]

This cake is a cheap but luxurious twist on my original banana bread, slightly more moist and gooey than the first iteration, with a home made sticky syrup sauce to drizzle over the top, ideally warm from a jug. I have made this as a loaf cake and also as a round, Victoria sponge type cake, split in the middle with a buttercream style icing and extra syrup sandwiching it together. It can be as simple or as showstopper as you want it to be. If you keep frozen berries kicking about, scatter a few on top of the cake mixture as it goes into the oven; as it cooks, they will gently sink to suspend in the finished delicacy; if you stir them in, there is a risk they will all sink and give you a soggy bottom. If this happens, I generally allow the cake to cook completely before removing from the tin, level off the risen top so it is completely flat (a bread knife is best) and carefully turn it over …

White Chocolate Tea Bread [A Girl Called Jack]

This came about because I LOVE chocolate chip brioche – so I decided to try to make some chocolate chip bread as a replacement. Unfortunately, though, the chocolate chips all melted into the dough as I added my usual boiling water and I ended up with this Chocolate Tea Bread instead – but it was still delicious! I eat mine in chunks, warm with spread and a cuppa. I’ll make true chocolate chip brioche another day, but this is no apology – I’ve stumbled on something heavenly. Bliss! Makes 1 small loaf 275g self-raising flour (or 275g plain flour and 2 teaspoons baking powder or bicarbonate of soda), plus extra to knead the dough a 7g sachet of fast-acting dried yeast 50g sugar 200g white chocolate 25g butter, plus extra to grease the loaf tin 150ml boiling water with a tea bag steeped in it and allowed to cool (Trust me on this one!) Measure the flour, yeast and sugar into a large mixing bowl. Break the chocolate into chunks. It’s up to you how …