All posts tagged: yeast

Vegan ‘Egg’, Tomato & Cress Sandwich, 68p [from ‘Veganish’]

This recipe is based on my favourite ever egg sandwich – the M&S Egg, Tomato & Salad Cream – but I challenged myself to create it as a vegan version when I was writing Veganish. My readers had specifically requested sandwich recipes for this book, seemingly unanimously tired of the solitary falafel offering in the supermarket compared to the dozens of meat and cheese options. So I made a list of both my personal favourites, and asked people for theirs, and tried to recreate as many of them as possible, as closely as possible to the originals. And this was FUN. A whole lot more testing and retesting than most of my recipes, as well as side-by-side comparisons with the original. Literally a bite out of the M&S one, a bite out of mine. Proffering both at friends and asking them to guess which was which. Tweaks and adjustments and adding specialist ingredients in and taking them out again, until finally, satisfied, I ended up with this. I’m still undecided on the nutritional yeast, so …

Crumpets, 6p [from ‘Veganish’]

I very rarely advocate the use of specialist equipment in my recipes, but there is simply no way to make a crumpet without the use of an egg poaching ring. I retired mine when I went vegan, and had to properly search through my kitchen to find them again, but it was worth it. I picked mine up for £1 from a well known hardware and home store, and they have lasted a good few years so far, so I consider them a worthy investment. You could make a giant crumpet in a frying pan, I suppose, but it would be mighty ambitious. They take a little practise and patience, both of which I sorely lack, and I spent an entire day perfecting this recipe, which is virtually unheard of in my slapdash, quickfire kitchen, so enjoy them. There is an ongoing debate about whether they are best eaten for dinner, supper, breakfast, lunch, or tea – let me know when you have yours in the comments below! (This post is not sponsored; I provide …

White Chocolate Tea Bread, 9p [A Girl Called Jack]

This came about because I LOVE chocolate-chip brioche – so I decided to try to make some chocolate-chip bread as a replacement. Unfortunately, though, the chocolate chips all melted into the dough as I added warm water and I ended up with this Chocolate Tea Bread instead – but it was still delicious! Then I experimented with tea and white chocolate and stumbled on something heavenly. Bliss! Makes 1 small loaf to serve 6 people from 9p each. This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links and make a purchase. All prices correct at the time of printing and are subject to change. 275g self-raising flour, plus extra to knead the dough, 8p (45p/1.5kg) 7g fast-acting dried yeast, 7p (£1/100g) 50g sugar, 3p (69p/kg) 100g white chocolate, 30p 25g butter or baking block, plus extra to grease the loaf tin, 6p 150ml boiling water with a tea …

Pina Colada Bread, 15p [Tin Can Cook]

This is a brand new recipe from Tin Can Cook – 75 store cupboard recipes by Jack Monroe – which is available here, and there is a fundraiser to donate it to foodbanks here. I first made this on a dismal October morning after a long, uncharacteristically hot summer that had beamed in from mid-May until that particular drizzly day. My normally bright home was grey and miserable, and I yearned for the weather of the weeks and months before. Looking to inject some sunshine into my mood, I surveyed my tin collection and plucked out pineapples and coconut milk, and the Pina Colada bread was born. This recipe makes a rather large loaf; leftovers make for a phenomenal bread and butter pudding.   Makes 1 enormous loaf or 2 smaller ones, to serve approx 10 from 15p each. (This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links or …

Marmite on Marmite tast, home made bread recipe by Jack Monroe in partnership with Marmite

Marmite Bread, 8p

I love Marmite on toast as a simple, quick and healthy breakfast, but my mischievous mind is always stretching possibilities and pondering, and for a while I had been wondering whether I could make Marmite *in* toast instead. This recipe is not for the faint hearted – I use a LOT of the sticky black stuff, so you may wish to temper it slightly – but it has quickly won a place in the heart of my kitchen; for breakfast, spread with butter or peanut butter, or dunked into tomato soup, or with a little cheese melted on top… Makes 1 decent sized loaf to serve 8 from 8p each. This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links or purchase any ingredients. All prices correct at the time of printing and are subject to change. 50g Marmite, 40p (£2/250g) 400ml warm water 500g plain flour, 15p (45p/1.5kg) 2 …

Whirlybuns, 11p [Cooking On A Bootstrap]

These little weighty wistful whirls of whimsy came about entirely by accident. I was going to stay with friends in Manchester for the weekend, to all fling our small boys at one another for a raucous time, and I never like to accept hospitality empty handed. So, I set about making a hulking great fruit bread big enough to energise 3 grown men, 3 grown women, and 3 small and boisterous boys. I mixed it, kneaded it, left it to rise…and promptly forgot all about it until I was halfway across the country. Silly me. I came home to find it fermenting beautifully, tickling the top of the teatowel flung over the top of it. I gave it a ginger sniff, it smelled a lot like sourdough. Vaguely remembering a yoghurt based bread I had made a few years ago, I figured it would be fine, and whipped it into these whirlybuns. J and A, here’s what you coulda had… Sorry! Makes a dozen pleasingly enormous buns at 11p each 750g plain flour, 28p (55p/1.5kg/Basics) …

Slow Cooker Bread, 2p

I have been asked for this recipe incessantly on my social media since I started to make it a few days ago, so I made time today to sit down and type it up for my lovely, loyal readers. I hope you enjoy it – I am really loving my slow cooker adventures so far! Many of you have asked me if there is a slow cooker book in the pipeline; I am busy finalising Tin Can Cook at the moment and have started writing the Vegan one, but I always have my feelers out for what my next project is going to be, so if a slow cooker book would be of interest, do leave a comment below and let me know! Each compartment of my triple slow cooker is 1.3l, so to make matters simple, and after a little trial and error, I worked out that the optimum amount of flour to make a really good bread in it, is 260g. I started at 350g, and upon seeing how splendidly it rose, reduced …

Chickpea & Tomato Brunch Loaf, 16p [A Girl Called Jack]

This loaf first appeared in my first cookbook, A Girl Called Jack, and is a favourite weekend recipe of mine. It was based on a similar loaf from Economy Gastronomy, by Allegra McEvedy and Paul Merrett, using mashed chickpeas and sun dried tomatoes, but mine is, as ever, the more austere version. It is delightfully accidentally vegan, and robust enough for toasting, serving with a pile of grilled tomatoes or some kind of roasted red pepper dip. If you don’t finish it before it goes stale, the breadcrumbs make an excellent topping for a simple pasta dish, too. Makes 1 decent sized loaf, to serve 6 from 16p each. This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links and make a purchase. All prices correct at the time of printing and are subject to change. 400g carton of chickpeas, 40p 1 tbsp oil, 2p (£1.10/1l) A pinch of …

Pint-Glass Bread, 14p [Cooking On A Bootstrap]

This is the easiest and tastiest bread, from only a handful of ingredients, and a pint glass. No weighing, just throw it together. The beer gives it a sourdough taste, without all the fannying about that genuine sourdough requires. Serves 6 from 14p each. This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links or purchase any ingredients. All prices correct at the time of printing and are subject to change. 2 pint glasses of plain flour, plus extra for dusting, 18p 1 pint glass of warm cider or beer, 57p (£2.05/2l Crofters cider) 1 tsp dried active yeast, 5p a pinch of salt, 1p 1 tsp sugar, 1p oil, for the dough and greasing, 3p Stand your pint glass in a large mixing bowl, then fill it with flour. Tip it into the bowl and repeat. Use the butt, or bottom, or arse, of your glass to make …

Lardy Buns, 15p [Cooking On A Bootstrap]

I’ll always remember my first lardy cake; picked up from a surprisingly baked-goods-laden petrol station on the way home from a trip to Kent, and I subsequently slept all the way home in the passenger seat off the back of a few mouthfuls of unfashionably fat-laden, soft sweet carbohydrates. I set about researching how to make my own; half a block of lard still loafing in the fridge door from a previous Live Below The Line challenge could finally be put to use. Definitely not one for every lunch of the week, but a good shoulders-down, satisfying, occasional winter comfort. To make a whole loaf, simply pat into a round and cook for an hour instead. Makes 6 generously weighty ones at 15p each, that could double as a weapon should an intruder strike. This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links or purchase any ingredients. All …

Beer Bread, 5p [Cooking On A Bootstrap]

I had a small gathering of friends for lunch yesterday – the recipes of which are numerous and will follow in good time – and as is usually the way when a gathering imbibe themselves on sun and soaking up well-deserved drinks, as I tidied up this morning (for I am a slattern, but also have concussion and took my sober self to bed early after such frivolity), I came across half a glass of warm beer that had been sitting on the table all evening. Rather than pour it down the sink, I decided to rework the very simple Pint Glass Bread recipe from Cooking On A Bootstrap, and make use of it. Makes one small loaf, proportions dependent on how much or how little skanky warm beer you find behind the couch.  Serves 4-6 from 5p each. 240ml leftover beer, 14p (Tesco Everyday Value Bitter is £1 for 4x440ml) 300g flour, 9p (Tesco Everyday Value flour is 55p for 1.5kg) 1 tbsp/8.5g yeast, 8p (Allinson Easy Bake Yeast, £1/100g) First, measure your leftover beer. …

Tw*tbreads, 4p

I joke that ninety-seven percent of the spontaneous conversations that my friends start with me – especially mid afternoon or early in the evening – are panicked cookery conundrums, photographs of burned pans, musings about what to have for dinner based on photographs of their kitchen cupboards, or emergency cake queries. This afternoon was no exception. It started off innocently enough, as a dear friend sent a photograph of my tomatoey baba ghanoush recipe, announcing she was going to attempt to make it. This, you understand, is code for ‘please put your phone notifications on LOUD, because I’m going to need you’. I know how this goes by now. Four minutes passed before she was hinting for some kind of easy bread recipe to go with it. I hunted through my archives and found a flatbread recipe I had written for the Cook For Syria cookbook last year. ‘I’ll simplify it for you,’ I said. ‘Flatbread for tw*ts.’ (Yes, this is how we speak to one another. No, you were never supposed to know.) ‘TW*TBREAD!’. And so, the …

White Chocolate Tea Bread [A Girl Called Jack]

This came about because I LOVE chocolate chip brioche – so I decided to try to make some chocolate chip bread as a replacement. Unfortunately, though, the chocolate chips all melted into the dough as I added my usual boiling water and I ended up with this Chocolate Tea Bread instead – but it was still delicious! I eat mine in chunks, warm with spread and a cuppa. I’ll make true chocolate chip brioche another day, but this is no apology – I’ve stumbled on something heavenly. Bliss! Makes 1 small loaf 275g self-raising flour (or 275g plain flour and 2 teaspoons baking powder or bicarbonate of soda), plus extra to knead the dough a 7g sachet of fast-acting dried yeast 50g sugar 200g white chocolate 25g butter, plus extra to grease the loaf tin 150ml boiling water with a tea bag steeped in it and allowed to cool (Trust me on this one!) Measure the flour, yeast and sugar into a large mixing bowl. Break the chocolate into chunks. It’s up to you how …

Sunshine Bread [A Girl Called Jack]

The quantity given for the tin of pineapple chunks is approximate. Some tins are 200g, some are 227g, so don’t worry about weighing and measuring – just throw about half the tin in! you can put the remaining pineapple chunks from the tin into an airtight container with just enough juice to cover and pop into the fridge to snack on or use in another recipe. For a portable breakfast for me and Small Boy, or as a snack to keep in my drawer to chipmunk away on in the busyness of my day, I like to make individual buns – see the tip below. Makes 1 small loaf ((This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links or purchase any ingredients.) 350g plain flour, plus extra to knead the dough a 7g sachet of fast-acting dried yeast 1 carrot 30g sultanas 1⁄2 x 200g tin of pineapple …

Penny Pizzas [A Girl Called Jack]

I make penny pizzas as way of using up leftovers such as Mamma Jack’s Best Ever Chilli or Lentil Bolognese – but they are just as good topped with a dollop of tomato purée and some grated cheese. Or they are a good way to use up sliced mushy tomatoes that have passed their best and the dry ends of cheese. I have collected novelty cookie cutters over the years, so Small Boy often asks for ‘duckie pizza’ or ‘lorry pizza’ – resulting in a frantic delve through my kitchen to find the right one. (This post is not sponsored; I provide links to the ingredients that I use so you can see how I calculate my recipe costs, and I may earn a small commission if you click the links and make a purchase.) Makes 14 mini-pizzas (using an 8cm cookie cutter) 250g plain flour, plus extra to knead the dough a 7g sachet of fast-acting dried yeast optional: a pinch of salt 1 tablespoon oil, plus extra to oil the baking tray 200ml warm …